2016 Open rain: Wild weather forecast for golf’s summer of pain

More storms are predicted around Europe in 2019. Media playback is not supported on this device Angry end to PGA Championship Recent wet weather in Scotland and Northern Ireland has done little to distract…

2016 Open rain: Wild weather forecast for golf's summer of pain

More storms are predicted around Europe in 2019.

Media playback is not supported on this device Angry end to PGA Championship

Recent wet weather in Scotland and Northern Ireland has done little to distract experts at the British Weather Services from their ominous prediction of more change and wilder weather on the way.

The UK weather service says the weather pattern is one of instability in the high atmosphere and includes a number of other challenges, including a weaker jet stream with increased divergence.

The system is expected to lead to more “very damaging and erratic bouts of weather” and a warmer December than previous years.

And the British Weather Services certainly seems to believe the next nine months are shaping up to be the most unpredictable they have ever experienced, with a number of natural consequences.

And not just for golfers either.

Forecasters say this is in part due to the general change in climate pattern

Ken Currie of the British Weather Services told BBC Sport: “It’s pretty much what you would expect from a global pattern change, with the system becoming more unstable in the upper atmosphere.”

Forecasters are hopeful a warm spell in spring will help plants overcome the effects of prolonged wet weather

For golfers the wet and wild conditions last summer meant countless balls became entangled, putting greens turned to mud, and bets lost and won.

While there were calls for the British Open to return to weather-hit St Andrews, the patience of the R&A is being tested by the prospect of large fields in Scotland next year.

And after weeks of being braced for snow and cold in the northern hemisphere, the changing climate patterns are also putting caravans in jeopardy at the start of next month.

Currie says many moorland golf courses have to be strengthened as a result of the changing conditions and have to be actively guarded as threats and spring outbreaks become possible.

Snow and ice prompts hardship for the vulnerable at caravans

The Bureau of Meteorology recently gave the north of Scotland a chance of extremely snowy conditions in early December, and spring outbreaks such as snow and high winds will also impact tourism.

The British Weather Services is working with the tourism industry to help minimise the effect.

Its forecaster says that with a greater prospect of warmer winters in the autumn and spring next year, resorts are adopting a more adventurous approach to winter sports, particularly snow play.

And amid growing global concerns, the British Weather Services says there are now clear signs that the weather pattern leading up to 2021 is an indication of more frequent extreme weather in the future.

“Climate change is driving more extremes in the climate system,” Currie says.

“Longer term models show an overall warming trend with temperatures of around 1.7 degrees C since 1950.

“It is not a surprise to see this shift in climate patterns.”

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