MPs Complain of BBC ‘Breach of Law’

By Natalie Norris’ Politics special correspondent, the mic Almost 30 percent of the more than 140 MPs in the House of Commons from the Nationalist, Conservative and Labour parties have complained to the parliamentary…

MPs Complain of BBC ‘Breach of Law’

By Natalie Norris’ Politics special correspondent, the mic

Almost 30 percent of the more than 140 MPs in the House of Commons from the Nationalist, Conservative and Labour parties have complained to the parliamentary Standards Commissioner. They say Laura Kuenssberg broke the law when she conducted a one-to-one survey of the 2018 Christmas dinner.

Ms Kuenssberg, BBC political editor, was conducting a one-to-one interview with Theresa May about the final Brexit deal for the Christmas broadcast. The poll revealed a wide discrepancy in MPs’ and the public’s views on the Brexit deal, causing heated exchanges between Mrs May and Labour’s Jeremy Corbyn.

Unsurprisingly, the party bosses say this breach of the MPs’ code of conduct should be looked at.

The code was signed off by all three parties following a series of bad-tempered debates and parliamentary interventions in 2016 and 2017, including one over cyber security and allegations by former UKIP leader Nigel Farage of a plot by the Conservative Party to sabotage the Labour Party’s efforts to become the official opposition.

Under the code, an MP can face censure by the Conservative Parliamentary Party if their behaviour “amounts to a serious breach of the code or seems likely to lead to serious damage to Parliament’s reputation.”

In 2016, 33 MPs held a meeting on whether MPs should be required to publicly declare who has paid for their business class flights and other expenses. Over 220 MPs of all parties responded to the request for feedback.

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Watch the second video on the www.politics.com

Closing remarks: Phil Lines (Jeremy Corbyn’s press office): It is absolutely understandable the members of the Scottish National Party and the Labour Party are disappointed that the BBC did not exercise greater care over its use of Parliamentary Question Time for the 2018 Christmas Party Challenge. The BBC has acknowledged they made a mistake and are not currently in possession of any further information in this respect.

Political Correspondent: We’re just hearing about the Adam Frost awards of course. Who was the journalist that appeared most unsightly on each of the channels that we’re really looking at tonight? There is no off switch on this, isn’t there?

Chancellor, Philip Hammond (Strictly, on live TV): Again, thank you very much for having me on. Yes.

Closing remarks: Just a few tweets before I call a political correspondent out for being nervous? (Displays an imaginary smartphone.)

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