Nasa simulations provide insight into flying saucers and the technological future

How much will the next generation of flying saucers be able to spin? What the future holds The US defence technologies agency, one of Britain’s Department for Education undergrads, takes a positive view, stating…

Nasa simulations provide insight into flying saucers and the technological future

How much will the next generation of flying saucers be able to spin?

What the future holds

The US defence technologies agency, one of Britain’s Department for Education undergrads, takes a positive view, stating that the “focus of government, industry and academia … is the single-minded mission of creating a safe, cheap, portable first-class flying saucer”. It asserts that research and development will “hold potential to solve range of flight and surveillance problems, including detecting and tracking hostile aircraft at low altitudes”. However, one final insight into what might be achieved come 2062: “The Vehicle for Supersonic Transport programme was cancelled in 2010, but there is a strategic understanding in the British government that this could be revived one day.”

Robots to be controlled by ‘cyborgs’

Britain stands ahead of the game, with the DARPA Robotics Challenge, in which teams of military and medical personnel can test self-driving vehicles and robots for emergency assistance. The final challenge, due in 2020, will see human operators operating robots remotely, but some will be “bio-holographic” or “cyborg”, essentially controlling robots directly. “Cyborgs” are said to give a robot a human-like mental ability through artificial intelligence.

Nasa simulations give insight into flight in 100 years’ time

Some see a UFO being filmed as it rains. Photograph: J.J. Leonard/Alamy Stock Photo

What the past says

On behalf of two of the UK’s leading astronomers, Michael Brown of the California Institute of Technology and Colin Fox of Imperial College London, the Royal Astronomical Society asks “With technological developments taking shape in the world beyond the 24th century, how might we be treated in 100 years’ time?” They then proceeded to pull out some that mean the sky’s the limit.

Aliens to infiltrate as part of the EMP clock

The beeping alarm blaring from a spaceship driven by an alien of illusory humanoid form will once again thrust to the forefront the so-called “battery kill switch”, a highly sensitive and imprecise means of controlling a planet. The breakthrough for the clock is so ripe for production that, by 2019, it will be activated.

Military scientists identify gamma ray explosions as the future of warfare

While acknowledging the “best result of the first five years” may be to detonate the same event many times over, a recent study by US aerospace experts shows that the future of warfare will bring with it a technological revolution in “electronic warfare”. Boom islands or cubist-looking control systems could, feasibly, be used, but the real impact could come from smaller explosions from “gamma ray-emitting” devices known as “dumb blips”. This could augment or destroy missiles, drones, ship’s hulls and planes.

Cannibalism to be offered to famine-stricken humankind

Cannibalism will be necessary for survival in the year 2938 in a world seen by the ARC (Science and Technology Arm of the Government of England) as experiencing “billions of years of CO2-neutrality and only 27 days of mass starvation”. Genetically, we are all vampires, giving us the ability to eat other people’s flesh. Diet and lifestyle advice would be offered to farmers to adapt accordingly.

The future is … electronic warfare

Electronic warfare, or “electrically generated weapons”, might be more popular than ever, as all humans will be already harried by peer-to-peer cyberterrorism. EE weaponry could be your familiar array of laser and electromagnetic ray weapons, but could also include a new class of weapon, electromagnetic proximity arrays that cause harm by extending to the human body with the intent of triggering electric currents that disable organs, causing bodily paralysis.

Deli taste: the burger of the future

As restaurants and goods increasingly become computerised, how will diners encounter food and drink in the year 2938? Specifically, what do the experts have to say on that? Well, we know they see advanced cooking facilities now – “our future kitchens will contain monitors and technology for precise and informed cooking.” And they’re predicting what will inevitably be “the steak of the future”.

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