Talking about English: Seven new and old favourite characters in the language

These videos have been put together by BBC Languages as a useful guide for all of you: Here, we feature seven different sets of characters and short bits of dialogue, making for a quick…

Talking about English: Seven new and old favourite characters in the language

These videos have been put together by BBC Languages as a useful guide for all of you: Here, we feature seven different sets of characters and short bits of dialogue, making for a quick and entertaining series of audio snippets about the new language, acronyms and even a sample of some of our newer phrases. Our hope is that these will appeal to you, and help you realise what you can learn at any time of the day. Here, we feature seven different sets of characters and short bits of dialogue, making for a quick and entertaining series of audio snippets about the new language, acronyms and even a sample of some of our newer phrases. Our hope is that these will appeal to you, and help you realise what you can learn at any time of the day. I love working for BBC News and BBC Breakfast

From office workers to gardeners, and professionals and students, there are many groups of people who may never have considered themselves part of the everyday vocabulary of how we communicate. However, with the help of BBC Languages, and easy-to-use audio clips from around the world, you are free to explore a range of new vocabulary! We are introducing phrases that are now part of everyday language, including (all capital letters are bolded for emphasis)

:: Previously banned words – hello!!!

:: Word that you don’t find at your workplace that you did (revisit your paragraph!)

:: Google translate lyrics of a popular song

:: So haaaaa!

:: When you reach the other side of the World Cup you’re done!

:: This is what it means (this is also not a capitalisation) – use words like coochie coochie coochie, boo, lagoon and house of the cobweb

Cooochie COOchie coochie

Boo … lagoon !!!

Lagoon ….… say u roo eh eh eh eh eh eh eh eh eh oh

House of cobweb …. she!

Since we first introduced our pronunciation guide of some of the everyday phrases of English in January 2014, you have found yourself developing a vocabulary of your own! Have you developed any new phrases yourself?

Wouldn’t it be a wonderful thing if you could become fluent in different kinds of English, such as some of the foreign phrases you can easily find in television dramas?

How about picking up some Vietnamese during the making of Gogglebox? Could German be the new Dad’s Army as you’ll be spending hours watching your younger generation? We have also spoken to researchers at St Mary’s University in the UK, who gave us a flavour of a Russian language class in a country famous for having a short attention span. What are some things you might be able to learn about your home country’s language?

In spite of the internet availability of everything, people still need to come to the scene in person to meet the people that use English – a theatre, restaurant, football grounds and club rooms.

As the travel industry continues to push more products and services in both English and other languages, this is all set to change.

In response to the changing nature of work, we are working to set the terms of engagement for the future, having spent years in providing easy-to-use, learning-friendly videos and audio of a range of languages, including simple audio that can be added to your job-book for an hour’s worth of learning for free. Have you been learning different languages online? How would you describe your current online language learning habits? Your thoughts on language learning could feature in the next video series. Are you currently learning a language online? If so, please share your experiences with us! Let us know, and leave a comment below – we’d love to hear from you!

Did you know that you can download the sound files here?

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