This man holds a unique role in world football and it could save the planet

This article is over 3 years old This article is over 3 years old Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall will host two televised debates between industry leaders on Wednesday evening This man holds a unique role in…

This man holds a unique role in world football and it could save the planet

This article is over 3 years old

This article is over 3 years old

Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall will host two televised debates between industry leaders on Wednesday evening

This man holds a unique role in world football and it could save the planet

The next debate between a sitting British prime minister and a football player or an undercover journalist is set to take place on Wednesday evening in an unusual forum – a single set of football boots.

Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall, a former food writer turned journalist, will take on David Cameron in a “football boots to pens” debate over climate change, amid the theme of food sustainability.

The two-and-a-half-hour debate, which is due to air on the BBC, will focus on the topic of food.

It will be hosted by Fearnley-Whittingstall for the Three Rivers Trust – which he co-founded in 2010 to support farmers in the north of England, including an association with the 15th‑century landowner and philanthropist Edward Chipeur.

Fearnley-Whittingstall’s involvement with the Three Rivers Trust won him a CBE in the 2015 New Year Honours list.

It is the latest of a series of recent live debates between politicians and footballers, including Stella Creasy and Newcastle United striker Dwight Gayle in July, and Andy Burnham and football stars Rio Ferdinand and Jamie Carragher last month.

The format for the latest debate in the BBC Two “Football Votes” campaign – which is promoting a “food for all” vote in the European parliament in May next year – has not been announced, although the debate is expected to involve football matches played at no financial cost.

Chipeur said: “When I was starting the trust, I knew that my personal crusade would have to start by helping to rescue the land from pestilence in its own natural state. I am absolutely delighted that the trust and the Three Rivers will be working together.

“I know from my long relationship with the trust and their founder Nigel Smith that, though we have our differences in politics, I would find his independent, fair-minded and caring approach wonderful to listen to.”

The Three Rivers Trust was set up as a non-profit conservation charity in 2002 and is located in Stevenage. The charity has raised more than £25m to help landowners regain their land as natural habitat.

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