Woman’s birthday turns into blood-soaked elation during unexpected solar eclipse in Antarctica

A total solar eclipse — when the moon completely blocks the sun from view — occurred over Antarctica on Wednesday. The eclipse began when the moon appeared partially covered by the sun on the…

Woman’s birthday turns into blood-soaked elation during unexpected solar eclipse in Antarctica

A total solar eclipse — when the moon completely blocks the sun from view — occurred over Antarctica on Wednesday.

The eclipse began when the moon appeared partially covered by the sun on the horizon. The moment when the moon completely blocks the sun was simultaneous for all users, and the view was simultaneously captured and uploaded to social media sites.

The Earth, as well as five of the planet’s continents — Africa, Australia, South America, Antarctica and the Mediterranean — experienced a total solar eclipse for the first time in 25 years, according to the Associated Press.

The rare event has also given meaning to a moment of weakness and blushes for one birthday girl.

Observing the solar eclipse from Cape Adare is one of the most unbelievable, long-winded ways to celebrate a birthday. It’s less like walking through the cobwebbed woods and more like a dangerous voyage through the men’s polo field of a cathedral. pic.twitter.com/YRtfTAwzWv — Matt Goulding (@gouldingmatt) May 5, 2018

The five continents that crossed the path of totality saw a lunar-antennae-shaped sun shadow travel across the South Pole, leaving a ring of partial darkness over the 1.5 million-square-mile continent.

The last time it occurred in Antarctica was in 1991, which means thousands of people will have endured the pain of seeing the solar eclipse without there being light at all to read The New York Times.

Not everyone felt like sitting around watching the eclipse outside.

In sub-zero cold of Antarctica, a total solar eclipse has become a favored way for introverts to go about their twilight hours. One professor of Russian literature, Natalia Zhelanova, even got her husband to come along, because she’s been unable to leave Antarctica for the past three years and didn’t want to leave him behind on his birthday.

The good news is that a total solar eclipse occurs roughly once in two years. Next March, the sun will partially block the moon’s light.

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